Monthly Archives: January 2016

“A teacher who is not reflective can be transformed…”

(Killen, 2013, p. 127)

10078740256_1c286d3710_oFlickr: Liz West, “Frog pond”

When I did my CELTA four years ago there was some focus on reflective teaching and the numerous workshops I attended with TESOL France reiterated its importance. Essentially teachers need to figure out what went well and why, so that they can improve on different points in future lessons. Admittedly, although I would reflect throughout my CELTA course and after lessons that had been observed, writing a reflective journal after each lesson hasn’t been one of my priorities in my teaching career up to now.

Being a social creature, (as all the teachers I know are), it is always a real pleasure for me to have a chat with my colleagues about how my lessons are going. I think this is quite helpful for me, but there are definitely a couple of problems with this being the only kind of real reflection going on. Firstly, I’m not sure if this provides the kind of deep and systematic reflection that is necessary to change my teaching in any radical way. Secondly, the fact that I haven’t been putting my thoughts on paper makes it impossible to track my progress from week to week and compare lessons over time. Both making changes and keeping track will be really important to polish everything up before my teaching pracs this year.

Beginning this week, I’m going to make a point of finding five to ten minutes at the end of each day to squeeze in some meaningful, written reflection. Hopefully this way I might just pick up on a few things that need fine-tuning, (as well as the ones I already know about).  I think a journal will be the way to go, (some things I might not yet be ready to share with the big wide web), but I’m also committed to reviving my blog and consolidating some of my thoughts this way. I’ve seen the error of my ways and am on the road to being the deeply reflective teacher that I aspire to be!

 

 

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Teaching for Retention

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Unlike the 17 year-old me who started university eight years ago, this time around I have a lot more motivation, as well as some pretty effective study and time management techniques. In my spare time over the last few weeks I’ve had my head stuck in one of the the course textbooks, (Killen, 2013, Effective Teaching Strategies: Lessons from Research and Practice), for the professional practice paper starting late next month. It led me onto another surprisingly interesting book by Willis (2006) which focuses on how teaching can be made more effective in order to help students retain information and explains in basic terms how brains operate.

Essentially, learners need to be ready to learn, (have had enough sleep, aren’t stressed and have their interest piqued), before teachers even try to teach them anything. Then it’s essential to present information in a variety of ways to engage as many of their senses as possible. Ideally students will also be able to interact with new information on personal and meaningful level so that they are more likely to retain it in their long-term memories. Willis also emphasizes the importance of repetition and the importance of taking syn-naps, (or brain breaks), to allow information to sink in.

This week I’m going to make sure that my students are engaged at the beginning of each lesson, through a 5-minute game, a picture or a new seating arrangement. It’s also going to be important to keep my students’ concentration at a maximum by breaking up activities with short breaks, followed by some kind of consolidation activity. Although I am usually quite good at giving information both verbally and in written form, it’s going to be a challenge for me to use more images/symbols in my teaching and to encourage my students to do the same thing in their learning.

It’s only Saturday, but I’m already looking forward to getting back to work on Monday to put some of these concepts into practice and see my (sometimes forgetful) students through a new lens. In the meantime I’ll get my head back into that book!

 

 

New Year – New Projects

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Although I don’t have any new year’s resolutions involving diet and exercise, (although perhaps I should), the last heavenly three weeks that I spent with my little boy Hugo, swimming at the beach and walking the dog, have given me the clarity to figure out some plans for the year. I’ve decided to bite the bullet and enroll at Curtin University to do a Graduate Diploma in Education (secondary) and hopefully get into a different kind of teaching.

We’ve bought a block in our dream destination, Margaret River, and should have a slab very soon. The beaches there all look like postcards, the vineyards are fabulous and every person we have ever met down there are really friendly. In some ways it has a really European feel about it and makes us feel like we’re back in France. It’s a great place to raise kids and there’s even a new primary school that is going to be built within walking distance of our place.

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Flickr: Robert Young, Vineyard

Unfortunately, from what I can see, there isn’t much of an ESL scene, which means I won’t be able to do exactly the same kind of work I’ve been doing for the last four years. After toying with some radical career changes involving a whole new three or four year degree, I’ve decided that I would love to be a secondary school teacher. Hopefully with some patience and perseverance I will be able to find some work in the region, and enjoy it as much as I do teaching adults.

Another project that has me fascinated at the moment is the Country Teaching Program and the Remote Teaching Service. Essentially, teachers are encouraged to work in country towns all over the states for one year or more and incentives depend on the remoteness of the school. I think it would be a great adventure for my family and it would be really satisfying for me to put my ESL teaching experience to use in an Aboriginal community. I am also sure that some materials-light teaching in a small school will give me some really valuable experience that will make me a better teacher.

Flickr: Georgie Sharp, "Horseshoe Range"

Flickr: Georgie Sharp, “Horseshoe Range”

For the moment I’ll keep my head in the course textbook and enjoy being a student some of the time, rather than just having a teaching role. I’m expecting some really good things from 2016 and hope that the things I learn will get me ready for adventures in years to come!