Teaching for Retention

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Unlike the 17 year-old me who started university eight years ago, this time around I have a lot more motivation, as well as some pretty effective study and time management techniques. In my spare time over the last few weeks I’ve had my head stuck in one of the the course textbooks, (Killen, 2013, Effective Teaching Strategies: Lessons from Research and Practice), for the professional practice paper starting late next month. It led me onto another surprisingly interesting book by Willis (2006) which focuses on how teaching can be made more effective in order to help students retain information and explains in basic terms how brains operate.

Essentially, learners need to be ready to learn, (have had enough sleep, aren’t stressed and have their interest piqued), before teachers even try to teach them anything. Then it’s essential to present information in a variety of ways to engage as many of their senses as possible. Ideally students will also be able to interact with new information on personal and meaningful level so that they are more likely to retain it in their long-term memories. Willis also emphasizes the importance of repetition and the importance of taking syn-naps, (or brain breaks), to allow information to sink in.

This week I’m going to make sure that my students are engaged at the beginning of each lesson, through a 5-minute game, a picture or a new seating arrangement. It’s also going to be important to keep my students’ concentration at a maximum by breaking up activities with short breaks, followed by some kind of consolidation activity. Although I am usually quite good at giving information both verbally and in written form, it’s going to be a challenge for me to use more images/symbols in my teaching and to encourage my students to do the same thing in their learning.

It’s only Saturday, but I’m already looking forward to getting back to work on Monday to put some of these concepts into practice and see my (sometimes forgetful) students through a new lens. In the meantime I’ll get my head back into that book!

 

 

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