Category Archives: Lesson plans

TESOL France Presentation Overview – Tailoring ESP courses – Part 1: Comparing hotels with travel agents

Wharariki Beach

Wharariki Beach

Last weekend I was lucky enough to attend the TESOL France annual coloquium in Paris, where I met some great teachers and attended some excellent presentations. I gave a presentation myself about exploiting companies’ promotional materials for teaching and I thought I’d write up a little overview here. Here’s the first part, watch this space for the construction and pharmaceuticals industries, as well as some FAQs.

The problem: Business English and ESP teachers aren’t always trained in whatever they need to be teaching

My first few teaching jobs were disasters. I prepared my classes on my own and oblivious to pedagogy and professional objectives, I taught grammar-heavy classes which were simply too general. My CELTA helped with the pedagogy side of things, but didn’t give me any better idea about how to make my classes more relevant to my students’ jobs. And while I do cringe when I think about some of the classes I taught in those beginning days, they do serve as excellent lessons as to what not to do when teaching BE and ESP classes. I know teachers are really busy and aren’t always specialists in the areas they’re teaching in, but at the end of the day we’re being paid to teach relevant skills that students can use immediately in their jobs.

How can we keep our teaching relevant?

Here are a couple of things that are particularly important

Needs analyses

Schools generally do these at the beginning of a course as well as an oral evaluation, (if your school doesn’t, you’ve got a problem). It’s important to read through them regularly throughout the course to keep the students’ objectives fresh in your mind. However detailed the reports you get may be, it’s still important to talk you your students about their objectives when you first meet them, as well as the situations where they need English.

Every lesson, ask your students what they’re up to

Needs change, and to be the most effective teacher you can be, you need to keep up with them. Ask your students about projects they’re working on at the moment and ask them to bring along an email or a plan and talk you through it. Have them practice their presentations on you.

Troll for information about their job and their industry

Pick up brochures at reception (if you’re lucky they might be some in English). Take a look at the company’s website and websites of competitors. Another suggestion I had was to contact the HR department and get a job description to give you a better idea.

COMPARING HOTELS AND DESTINATIONS WITH TRAVEL AGENTS

  • A little background

The company my student works for organizes international group travel to Eastern Europe, the Americas and Asia. Although the organizational side of things is in French, my student and her colleagues accompany groups to different locations. She needed to be able to fulfill the roles including guide, interpreter and support person. My student began at an elementary level, so it was important to break the course up into manageable chunks and balance the practical English focus with fundamental grammar. You can see here the topics we covered, they’re all pretty straightforward ‘travel English’, although I didn’t manage to find everything I needed in textbooks and travel guides. Finding materials for the airport English part was easy enough online, and the textbooks we work with seem to all have parts with some vocabulary for recommending places and giving directions. Explaining to an Indian police officer that your wallet and passport have been stolen or that your client is having a heart attack is a different story.

  • A mini-presentation to work on hotel vocabulary and comparatives

When designing a package, my student needed to decide on which hotels groups would stay at and obviously compare them based on criteria including location, facilities and price. To begin with, I gave her a little presentation about two hotels in a destination I had chosen myself and showed her their websites. The presentation I did with my student was simply browsing the net, so the preparation was minimal. I simply looked at the hotels’ webpages and their corresponding TripAdvisor reviews to look at vocabulary for describing hotels as well as comparisons.

HW Beach photo

I’m going to go on holiday with my mum to the Coromandel Peninsula in the North Island of New Zealand. It’s a region with beautiful hills, forest and beautiful beaches. The most famous beach is called ‘Hot Water Beach’. It gets its name from the hot water that comes up from springs under the ground and at low tide visitors like to dig holes in the sand and sit in the hot pools. I would like to spend one week relaxing on the beach, doing some bushwalks and reading books. I need to book some accommodation, and I have two possibilities in mind

The first place I’ve found is a bed and breakfast called ‘Hot Water Bed and Breakfast’. Does a bed and breakfast. It has a view of the ocean and is very close to the beach and the forest. There is a balcony where I can read my book and relax. The beds are queen-sized and the price is $120 per night which is around 75EUROs. It has tea and coffee making facilities and breakfast is included. Unfortunately there’s no wifi, so I won’t be able to upload my holiday photos until I get home.

The second place is called ‘Whitianga Beach Motels and Cabins’. It’s also very close to a beach, although you have to drive for half an hour to get to Hot Water Beach. Here, it’s possible to order breakfast, lunch and dinner. There are laundry facilities, so I can wash my clothes and the rooms have single and double beds. The price is $110 a night, which is around 65EUROs. There are also tea and coffee facilities and wifi. 

Which of these do you think I should choose? Why?

(write target language on board – comparatives and facilities)

Perhaps before I book I should have a look at some reviews to help me with my decision?

First, let’s have a look at the reviews for the bed and breakfast. You can see that 28 people have reviewed it as ‘excellent’ and it only has one ‘poor’ review. The last reviewer ‘loved it’ and overall it looks like a pretty popular place.

Here you’ll see that we have a review that would be too advanced for my elementary learner; with a lot of vocabulary that might not be particularly useful for her (I’m not sure when she’ll have the opportunity to use “wallowing” or “nomads” in the future). Here I think it would just be best to focus on the title of the review.

Now let’s have a look at the Beach Motel and Cabins in Whitianga. Oh dear, this doesn’t look good. We have four ‘average’ ratings and three ‘terrible’ ones. And the most recent person didn’t like it at all. Here I think it’s important to look at the vocabulary ‘disgusting’, ‘filthy’ and ‘smelly’ and it could also be a good time to talk about things in hotel rooms like sheets, pillowcases, tea and coffee facilities, mould…

I then asked her to prepare a similar mini-presentation of two hotels at a destination of her choice. The students I have worked with have all enjoyed this exercise as I suppose it was interesting in that they discovered a new place in the world they might not have hear about before. I think they also appreciated doing something a little different from the textbook, although I did use the textbook as support for a clear presentation of comparatives. They could see the point in it and would use the same skills in their work immediately after.

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Young learners activity – teaching numbers and actions

Flickr - Rameshng

Flickr – Rameshng

On Saturday mornings I have the pleasure of teaching a nine year-old boy English for an hour. Although I prefer to have a good range of tasks in each of my business English classes, the energy of my younger student is always a fresh reminder of the importance of variety. We read books, use flash cards for vocabulary and sing songs. In the spirit of learning by doing, today we tried a new game for practising some action verbs and numbers (I suppose you could use this for any vocabulary really), and I’d love to share it with you!

What you’ll need:
– About 10 post-it notes
– Enough space for your student(s) to run around without hurting themselves

What to do:
– With your students, write a different number on each post-it note (for example my student has problems with 11-20, so we used those numbers today)
– Ask your students to stick the post-it’s randomly around the room
– Now give the students instructions on which number to go to and how to get there, for example “Run to number 11”. You can also use different actions for movement like hop, skip, jump, walk, swim, fly. Be creative!
– I think this would be great if you had a group of students and they could take turns to give instructions
– When the kids are out of energy, you can ask them to bring you the post-its back one by one and tell you what is marked on them

I’d love to hear from anyone who has other suggestions!

Advanced Business English Video Lesson Plan – Start-ups

This is a little lesson idea I came up with when working with a student who is thinking about starting his own business. It uses part of a Dragons Den episode, a reality television show from the UK where start-ups present their businesses to a panel of ‘Dragons’ in a bid to have them invest. It provides an excellent opportunity to talk about whether a company or product is worth investing in, making predictions about a market and looking at the use of the present perfect when talking about a company’s performance.

Time: 1:30-2 hours

1. Brainstorm

What factors do investors take into account when looking to invest in companies?

2. Pre-teach ‘Nuisance phone call’
3. Watch the pitch and stop video before the questions (Begins at 44:09)

4. Have the student talk you through how the product works (watch again if necessary)

5. Rate product according to factors thought about in brainstorm

6. Think about some questions that you’d like to ask the inventor about the product and the business

7. Watch the questions, see if you came up with any that were similar to the Dragons’

8. Watch the final part again, focus on where the inventor gives updates on what he has sold so far. Evaluate his responses and look at why he uses the present perfect

9. Think about some other potential answers to the questions which might not have had such a positive response

This model could easily be followed using many different Dragons Den’ pitches, depending on the industry and specialization of the student. It could also be followed up with different tasks including a student’s presentation of their future company and a Q&A session.

The Best Job in the World – Lesson plan

Today I taught a lesson inspired by Designer Lesson‘s ‘Best Job in the World’ lesson plan, which can be found here. In a nutshell, it is centered on a promotion run by Tourism Queensland in 2009, where candidates competed for the position of ‘caretaker’ on Hamilton Island, off the Great Barrier Reef. The successful candidate would be paid $150,000 for the contract.

This promotion is especially interesting from an English teaching perspective. It gives students the opportunity to express their opinion on what the best job in the world would be, to practise listening for key information and to explain who they think is the best candidate. From a business-English point of view, this also gives excellent opportunity for discussion about the marketing side, and why the promotion was so successful on a limited budget.

Also, being from that part of the world, it’s always a pleasure to have students discover the treasures of the Pacific.